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Risks of PCBs

Polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, are organic compounds that are used in the production of some coolant fluids. Those exposed to PCBs through the line of production, or from the product after its distribution, are at risk of experiencing health effects. Past studies have shown that people who have been exposed to PCBs can develop neurological problems, liver damage, skin diseases, and potentially cancer.

Of all the side effects, one of the most common is Chloracne; this is a skin condition theorized to be caused by exposure to toxic chemicals, such as PCBs and Agent Orange. The ailment persists up to decades of years post-exposure, and can leave life-long scars. Employers producing products that contain PCBs are at the highest risk of developing Chloracne, as it is contracted through direct contact or inhalation of these certain chemicals. Depending on the severity of the individual symptoms, treatment can be through antibiotics or acutane. However, the best solution is to disengage from any sources of potential exposure to PCBs.

Furthermore, experimental studies on laboratory rats have demonstrated that the development of cancerous tumors is a result of their ingestion of PCBs. The results of this study are supported by citizens of Anniston, Alabama, and those involved in the Pacific Gas and Electric case. These independent groups vouched their belief in the correlation between PCBs and harmful affects, including cancer.

Familiar with the use of PCBs in their production is Monsanto, an agriculture company that now manufactures farming products. Monsanto PCBs exist in coolant fluid used in electrical transformers, capacitors, and electrical motors. Regardless of their knowledge acquired regarding the emittance of PCBs, production continued.

Exposure to PCBs poses health affects that will seriously damage the quality of a person’s life. Avoiding the chemical is the most affective way evade contraction of the affects, and companies should exercise a high degree of corporate responsibility by discontinuing the incorporation of PCBs in their manufacturing processes.

Warning: What to do if Injured on Dangerous Premises

Premises liability is one of the leading causes for many personal injury claims. A person or establishment can be held liable for any injuries that another person can suffer when the injuries occurred within the premises. Premises liability does not only mean slip and fall accidents; it also cover dog or animal bites, assaults, and many others. As long as the person who owns the property is the one responsible or in control of the property and those inside it, they can be held accountable for any injuries that a person may sustain inside the premises.

There are factors that need to be present in order to make the property owner accountable for the injuries following a personal injury claim. First, it should be established that the property was considered dangerous, second that the owner was or should have been aware of the condition of the property and third that the property owner had the opportunity to correct the condition or provide warnings, but did not, which caused injury to the unknowing victim. It is generally the responsibility of the owner to ensure the safety of the property that is under their control, or to warn people regarding the dangers within the property.

Premises liability may also depend on the status of the injured person during the time of injury. If the person is an “invitee”, or someone who the property owner invited into the property, then the owner has the responsibility to warn or remove the invitees from any dangers within the property. Likewise, a “licensee” is someone who has consent from the owner to be on the property. If you ask an Oklahoma personal injury lawyer, they will likely inform you that a landowner does not have the duty to any adult trespasser, although they are prohibited from intentionally or willfully injure an adult trespasser in their property.

The Carelessness Rule of Personal Injury Liability

profile of woman driving car with angry faceThere are generally two roles within an accident scenario: one party who was more careless, and one party who was less careless. According to the carelessness rule of personal injury liability, the party who was more careless should pay reparations to the party who was less careless in proportion to how much more careless they were. This applies to most situations, including when the injured party had also been careless, or partially contributed to the event of their injury.

Carelessness can be construed through many forms. If a property owner has not properly maintained his building or grounds, then he is liable for any injury that may befall guests. If a manufacturer or seller delivers a defective product, then they both may be liable for any injury caused by the defect. If an employer fails to prevent an employee from being careless and causing injury to someone else, then the employer can possibly also be held responsible.

If more than two parties are involved in an accident, then most states mandate that any party involved pay full reparations to an injured party. This is likely to require some negotiation between the parties and their insurance providers in order to figure out who should pay whom.

Careless parties may not be held responsible for injuries caused by dangerous property if the injured party had no business being there; e.g., trespassing or snooping.